How to get rid of gophers

Thanks to Fred E.

How to get rid of gophers

.

.

Seems I missed posting yesterday.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Mutt and Jeff

Bud Fisher’s Mutt and Jeff debuted in 1907. It was the first daily comic strip. At first it was just A. Mutt. Later Jeff joined in. This is from 1918. The image is a little squirrely. I’m having trouble with my scanner. I took this image with my IPhone.

.

.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hello

From January 2001, this week it’s some stand alone gags…

.

.

.

.

.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Popeye

King Features’ biggest money maker of all time. I think it still is. By Elzie Segar. Later on it was drawn by Bud Sagendorf, and later by my friend Bobby London. My editor fired Bobby after he ran a story where Olive had a doll baby that was flawed, and she was going to send it back to its maker. Lots of people were deeply offended. Bobby still draws Dirty Duck for Playboy. He’s a terrific cartoonist.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Winsor McCay

Winsor McCay was one of the giants of early comic strips. He began around the turn of the century with several strips. One titled Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend was something of a precursor to his most famous creation in that it was about weird dreams. Little Nemo in Slumberland was his tour de force. It had to do with a little boy, Nemo, in which his dreams would take him to wonderful places with unusual (to say the least) characters and fantastic events. I have a Nemo comic strip hanging on my wall which I bought 40 years ago.

The book is by Fantagraphis. Rick Marschall, the editor,  gave me this book in 1992 when we were in Angoulême, France.

Here’s a sample page:

Winsor McCay also made the very first animated films, Gertie the Dinosaur being the best known. Read about McCay in his Wikipedia article. He was an absolute genius.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Krazy Kat

Pretty much agreed upon by newspaper strip cognoscenti, George Herriman’s Krazy Kat was the quintessential comic strip. It was perfect in its avant garde simplicity. It was never popular. Years ago I read in Bill Griffith’s strip Zippy the Pinhead, that it appeared at most in about 45 newspapers. But it had one very important fan. William Randolph Hearst. I don’t know how many papers Hearst had, but it probably appeared in all of them. It began as a throw away strip on the bottom of his Dingbat Family. In 1935 Hearst introduced color, and that was when Herriman really blosso0med. I spoke of Cliff Sterrett’s surrealism. Herriman and he stand head and shoulders above all other cartoonists in that art form. This is the first in a series of Krazy Kat collections published by Kitchen Sink.

 This is from 1935. Notice that the girl is holding a Krazy doll:

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Smithsonian Collection

If you’re a fan of the old comics, try to get ahold of this book:

.

.

.

.

.

It contains over 300 pages of classic comic strips. This is a better example of Cliff Sterrett’s Polly and Her Pals. It’s from 1926:

Talk about cubism and surrealism! Hearst had to rein him in a bit.

If you’ve read my comments you’ll know that my old teacher Mari0n Brady, has been in touch. Ever wonder why European kids are better educated than ours? Ever think there might be something wrong with our system? If you’re an educator, or if you’re just interested in education, here’s a link to his web site which offers his lessons free to use. Believe me, the guy knows what he’s talking about.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Rube Goldberg

  You remember him for his fantastic cartoon machines. Google him. He was first president of the National Cartoonist Society, and well loved by all those who knew him. Unfortunately I got into the game too late to have known him. Boob McNutt was just one of his several cartoon strips.

.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Old Comics

Cliff Sterrett was one of the great artistic innovators of the newspaper comic form. William Randolph Hearst evidently had a hard time keeping from delving too deeply into abstract art. Polly and Her Pals was one of the best of all those old comics. The comics that I’m going to post this week are from 1931.

.

.

.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Monday

Nothing today. All I did was wash my car. That’s not very interesting, is it?

.

.

.

.

.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments